The military coup in Myanmar illustrates the importance of evacuation plans

Photo Credits: Reuters

12/03/2021

Mark Lowe

While the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs is suggesting that Italian citizens consider leaving Myanmar, other governments have escalated their risk assessment levels and are advising their citizens to leave the country immediately.

British nationals have been advised to leave Myanmar unless they have an urgent requirement to remain.

The ministry’s advice highlights a number of concerns that companies have to take into consideration before sending employees into countries where there is a potential risk of having to evacuate them.

In Myanmar’s case, the advice stems from the consequences of the recent military coup, but emergency evacuations can also be determined by health emergencies, natural disasters, civil unrest, or open conflict.

The evacuation advisory highlights the importance of continuous situational awareness, of having a robust evacuation plan in place, and compliance with government guidelines and advice.

Situational awareness is fundamental to ensuring the safety and security of both staff members travelling internationally and those that are assigned to activities in a foreign country. It is essential that potential critical issues are identified in advance and that the monitoring process continues during their assignments.

Critical issues must be identified in order to define mitigation procedures and, in the case of an event, being in the condition to correctly manage the situation.

In those cases where there is a heightened threat of staff being exposed to security or health risks, an evacuation plan must be defined in advance of travel. The plan should be multilevel and thus take into consideration, in the case of staff assigned to long-term permanence in an at risk country, a gradual escalation process. For example family members should be evacuated first, those remaining should consider sharing accommodation, communications protocols should be reinforced, and the practical evacuation considerations implemented.

For example, as is the case in Myanmar, international flights may be suspended and thus overland travel, despite the great number of necessary considerations, may be an option if land borders are open.

However, if the international airport is open there may be the possibility of ‘relief’ flights being available for those seeking to leave the country. In many cases these flights are commercially bookable.

Staff training is essential and must be conducted well in advance of travel. The training in question will not be exclusively for those who will actually travel but will also include those employees who will provide support roles.

Various departments will be involved, including the legal department which will also play a key role in complying with government guidelines. This is an essential task as both legal and insurance considerations have to be examined and understood.

In terms of advance preparation and staff training, a number of considerations will have to be addressed including some very practical advice as to dealing with an evacuation. These considerations will include, but not be limited to, issues such as banks and ATMs being closed or unavailable and thus having sufficient funds and US Dollars for use at airports or for day to day necessities, the lack of internet connections and disruptions to local phone networks, curfews and general behavior during the emergency.

Political tension and unrest in Myanmar has spread since the military takeover, levels of violence are rising throughout the country and thus in a similar scenario those unable to leave the country should stay at home and stay safe. Guidance should be given in advance as to managing situations where the individual needs to leave home for essential reasons.

The situation in Myanmar illustrates what can happen in the space of a very short period of time and thus the importance of staff training, situational awareness,  preparation, crisis management, and having a robust travel risk management procedure in place.

Pyramid Temi Group can help you address all of these issues, contact us to discuss your requirements and how we can work with you to ensure that your travellers stay safe!


PTG has committed as a signatory member of the UN Global Compact

PTG has formally committed to respecting the ten universal principles in the fields of human rights, labour, environment, and anti-corruption

 

9th March 2021

PTG is proud to announce that we have committed as a signatory member of the UN Global Compact (UNGC).

UN Global Compact is the world’s largest corporate sustainability initiative.  It is a call to companies to align their operations and strategies with ten universal principles in the areas of human rights, labour, environment, and anti-corruption.

In signing the UN Global Compact, PTG joins over 16.000 leading organizations in 160 Countries which have actively committed to supporting and promoting corporate sustainability.

 

PTG’s mission as a Travel Risk Management company is providing organizations with global Security assistance and protection wherever business takes them. Safety, Security, responsibility and sustainability are fundamental aspects of our corporate strategy.

 

Our participation in the UN Global Compact strengthens our commitment to sustainability, responsibility and respect for human rights” says Roger Warwick, PTG’s CEO and Founder.

PTG is a Founder Member of ICOCA – International Code of Conduct Association for Private Security Companies, and we are the first Italian company to be certified to ANSI/ASIS PSC.1 2012, a management standard for quality of private security company operations. Joining the UN Global Compact reinforces our pledge to play a leading role on sustainable development in the global Travel Security industry”, adds Warwick.

 

 


What's driving your Travel Risk Management Policy?

18/02/2021

Mark Lowe

Photo Credits: James Eagle

 

Lessons learned from the world of Information Technology

Over the past couple of weeks, dozens of LinkedIn users have posted a somewhat interesting and thought provoking graphic.

The result of a survey conducted by James Eagle, a Zurich based investment writer and blogger, the graphic illustrates the result of a simple question: What drove digital transformation in your company, the Chief Executive Officer, the Chief Technology Officer or Covid-19?

A simple question to which a startling 88% of respondents specified Covid-19.

While there are few direct links between Travel Security and Digital Transformation, there are, however, some  parallels between the conclusion of the survey and an event that shook the Italian security community in January 2019.

 

What’s driving change in your organisation?

The question is simple but significant: What’s driving your organisation’s implementation of a Travel Risk Management policy? Hopefully, the driving force won’t be a reaction to a traumatic event.

Generally there are three principal answers to the question: compliance with the Italian legal framework, moral and ethical considerations, or the understanding that security adds value to a company.

 

“The idea of having to create and maintain a robust travel security programme can seem a daunting prospect”

 

If asked, most organisations will reply that all three combined are the driving force behind the development and implementation of an adequate Travel Risk Management policy.

For organisations that have as yet to implement the necessary policies, the idea of having to create and maintain a robust travel security programme may appear something of a daunting prospect.

However, if addressed correctly, the task can be broken down into a series of achievable steps that lead towards the objective of achieving full compliance with the legal, ethical and value considerations cited above.

 

Leadership and ownership

Stakeholder identification and their involvement through a precise breakdown of roles and responsibilities lies at the heart of the development of an organisation’s Travel Risk Management policy.

Leadership and ownership are the starting points. The first question has to be who or which department will take the lead? In all probability the choice will be to select an individual from the risk, security, legal, or human resources department.

 

“The first question has to be who or which department will take the lead?”

 

In most cases taking the lead will automatically imply ownership, the overall responsibility for the development and implementation of the organisation’s travel policy.

It is essential that departments work together guided by a holistic approach to travel risk management, this implies setting precise goals and objectives that will depend upon efficient interdepartamental communications and collaboration.

The most important piece of advice is that everyone in the organisation should perceive the Travel Risk Management policy as being supported at Board level and sponsored by each of the pertinent departments.

 

Conclusion

For a company’s Travel Risk Management policy to succeed, leadership, ownership and efficient management are the three essential components.

While management must make a determined effort to define and implement the necessary steps, it is essential that the objectives and advantages of a robust Travel Risk Management policy are shared and understood throughout the company.

While Pyramid Temi Group firmly believes that every organisation has the capacity to develop and implement a Travel Risk Management policy, we recognise that professional support and practical advice can go a long way to assisting companies achieve their objectives.

If you’re interested in knowing more about how our 40 years’ experience in Security and Travel Risk Management can benefit your company, we’re available to discuss your risk profile and analyse your requirements.

CONTACT US

 


Travel Security: identifying "Grey Rhinos"

Photo credit: Protesters build a brick barrier on a main road in the capital Khartoum, during a demonstration against rising prices. Photograph: Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images

 

17/02/2021

Mark Lowe

Food Insecurity should not be mistaken with famine or as being an issue that afflicts worn torn or drought-stricken countries and therefore nations that we are unlikely to visit.

On the contrary, food insecurity is a challenge that risks creating instability in towns and cities where we have business interests or where we intend pursuing opportunities.

The United States Department of Agriculture defines food insecurity as: “Occurring when households are unable to acquire adequate food because they have insufficient money and other resources.

One of the many direct consequences of the current pandemic is an increased level of poverty and therefore ever greater challenges for those trying to feed their families.

The potential consequences fit perfectly into the Grey Rhino category as they are foreseeable and could have a significant impact on traveller security.

 

“Food insecurity risks creating instability in towns and cities where we have business interests or where we intend pursuing opportunities”

 

Earlier this week Sudan declared a state of emergency in seven regions in order to stem violent protests over soaring food prices.

Buildings were looted and burned, and food was stolen from markets and shops during protests against dramatic increases in food prices.

The scenes witnessed in Darfur, North Kordofan, West Kordofan, and Sennar where curfews have been imposed and schools have been forced to close could very well be repeated in a number of other countries.

Food insecurity is not a new problem, but the current situation has accentuated the challenges faced by citizens in a number of countries throughout the world including many that we conduct business in.

 

Situational Awareness and Emergency Assistance

As part of our Duty of Care towards staff members travelling internationally we have to monitor ongoing situations and do our best to predict scenarios in which there is the potential for civil unrest or violence.

In 2021 food insecurity has to be considered one of the many Grey Rhinos that will put our Travel Risk Management Policies to the test.

Companies have to ask themselves not only how well organised they are to monitor current situations and forecast potential changes to the status quo, but also how well prepared they are to intervene in the case of the unexpected worst case scenario actually taking place.

 

“Knowledge is essential but it has to be supported by the capability to interpret updates and transform them into practical advice”

 

Preparation is the starting point but a reactive capability is also fundamental. It is not enough to be aware of risks and be alerted to sudden changes in countries or cities that interest us, staff members present in these locations must be given adequate, timely support in order to best manage the situation.

At Pyramid Temi Group we believe that analysis and planning are the building blocks of an efficient Travel Risk Management Policy and to this end we focus on assisting our clients correctly assess and plan for international travel.

We offer continuous updates on local security situations, we train staff members well in advance of travel and brief them before they depart, and we support them during their voyage by providing security updates and, crucially, advising them on best practices to adopt during a security event.

We believe that knowledge is essential but that it has to be supported by the capability to interpret updates and information and transform them into practical advice.

If you’re interested in knowing more about how our 40 years’ experience in Security and Travel Risk Management can benefit your company, we’re available to discuss your risk profile and analyse your requirements.

CONTACT US


Civil and Political Instability in 2021: what measures should a company have in place to deal with the protection of its staff?

Mark Lowe, 02/02/2021

The military coup in Myanmar was not hard to predict, indeed it was pre-announced and took place in a country with a long history of military political power. Nevertheless, events in the southeast Asian nation should make us reflect in terms of how many other countries are at risk of serious political instability during 2021.

Several fragile democracies are facing political elections over the coming eleven months and these planned events will require careful monitoring on the part of organisations with interests in these countries.

In addition, there is the risk of social instability provoked by the Covid pandemic spilling over into political unrest in a number of countries where no elections are on the cards.

Put quite bluntly, the impact of the pandemic on local economies has created greater poverty and the consequences will be greater criminality in some cases, protests against government management of the emergency in others, reduced efficiency and functionality of basic services in other cases, and all three in a number of countries.

This ‘Grey Rhino’ situation poses a number of questions that cannot be left unanswered, for example what impact could civil unrest have on exports and how will that impact supply chains, how can evolving situation be monitored, and, most importantly, what measures should a company have in place to deal with the protection of its staff?

With the roll-out of Covid vaccines, over time business travel will slowly begin to pick up but if Duty of Care was complex before the pandemic, the current situation is far more complicated due to Covid accentuating existing problems and introducing new ones.

While on the one hand it is imperative that companies monitor evolving situations closely, on the other it is equally important that their travel security policies are updated accordingly.

If the situation in Myanmar was predictable, the same might not be true in a number of other cases during 2021 and due to this organisations must make an extra effort to assure full Duty of Care for their staff.


Gestione dei rischi all'estero dei volontari delle ONG italiane

Risk Management: what can Italian NGOs to safeguard staff working abroad

After 18 long months of continuous doubt, anxiety and fear, the young Italian volunteer Silvia Romano has been reunited with her family, friends and colleagues.

Kidnaped from the Kenyan village of Chakama during an armed attack in which 5 local people were injured, she was transferred to Somalia and held by Islamist militants before finally being relaesed following lengthy and complex negotiations with her captors.

While Silvia can today begin a new chapter in her personal and professional life, a new chapter also needs to be opened in regards to the management of Non Governmental activities in complex environments such as Kenya where, as the case in question illustrates, the inherent risks also include the threat of abduction.

While we cannot under any circumstances shy away from the obligation of identifying a series of lessons learned, we must avoid the counterproductive temptation of polemic and non constructive criticism.

The reality of the fact is that Romano’s abduction was not the first of its kind, indeed there are a plethora of similar cases and this fact raises the question of both risk analysis and the capacity of organisations to mitigate and develop a capacity to manage crises.

To compound difficulties, one of the most obvious consequences of the current Covid-19 crisis is that non governmental organisations will be operating in environments where rising poverty levels will be accompanied by rising crime levels.

Without any shadow of doubt, as in 2015 Italy’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs will play an important role in guiding non governmental organisations in regards as to how to address security concerns. The roundtable discussions of 2015 produced a series of precious guidelines and it is only to be expected that they will represent the basis of future discussions.

However, whilst awaiting a new round of interaction and debate, Italian non governmental organisations have the opportunity to begin addressing security considerations and measures to deal with them.

This is of fundamental importance as not only is it an ethical, moral and legal requirements in terms of Duty of Care towards staff working in the field, but is also a question of the very same organisation’s survival: a kidnapping or death can result in funds drying up leading to the organisation being unable to continue field operations.

As specifically regards the legal obligation, what holds true for a private company holds true for a non governmental organisation: management has a precise duty towards staff and will be charged with criminal negligence if an investigation concludes that the necessary security measures were not implemented.

Put quite simply, it is a case of those less fortunate being put at risk of no longer receiving precious support and assistance due to an organisation not implementing the steps necessary to protecting their field operators.

While nobody will suggest for a moment that they know and understand the local reality better than the organisation actually working there, the experience and professionality of the private sector can be of great assistance.

A security provider has to be thoroughly vetted, this means not only a careful examination of the company and their staff’s practical experience, but also the details of their proposed strategy including full respect for human rights in accordance with  ICOCA (International Code of Conduct Association) principals.

Another important factor is that of choosing a provider that can cover all of the specific considerations: at the very least the development of procedures, staff training (basic and advanced), special risk insurance (medical and crisis), briefings and risk analysis, and the capability to fully support the organisation during all phases of a crisis.

As specifically regards insurance, while for well-known reasons K&R cover cannot be offered to Italian companies, it is worth clearing a little ambiguity: while the insurance cover in question will reimburse a ransom payment, perhaps more importantly it will cover the costs of the specialist assistance offered during and after the kidnapping event. It should be remembered that there have been cases where the protracted length of negotiations have resulted in the cost of the specialist assistance being greater than the ransom payment itself.

 

Pyramid Temi Group is very well aware of the value of the important work conducted by the NGO sector. We are amongst the founder members of ICOCA and our advisory services conform with the best practices and guidelines developed and adopted by the most important international associations and organisations. We are also aligned with the ISO31030 standard currently under development by the ISO TC262 technical committee of which PTG is a member.

We assist non governmental organisations in all phases of security planning and management from the development of procedures to the training of frontline staff and on-site support during a crisis.

Please contact us directly for a copy of our vadecum and description of our NGO support services.


An Evolving Crisis - Regional Updates. Country Status Report #6: Lebanon

Over the coming weeks Pyramid Temi Group will be publishing a series of updates from our regional hubs. The objective of the updates is to deliver informed comment and insight from our experts as to how a series of countries are addressing the Covid-19 (Coronavirus) emergency.

If you would like the updates delivered directly to your email box please sign-up to service by clicking here

Please note that in addition to the Covid-19 updates, those who sign-up to the service will receive a complimentary copy of our updated country report.


As the Covid-19 pandemic continues to spread, we spoke with the Managing Director at Pyramid Temi Group’s local partner company in the Lebanon to understand more about the current situation and which issues will become the most critical over the coming months.


Q: How is the population reacting to the spread of the virus?

A: Almost all civilians are abiding by the Government’s orders to stay in their homes and work remotely from there. However, a few days ago Riots re-emerged due to the losses of the Lebanese Pound against the United States Dollar.

 

Q: Which system has been adopted by the provincial government?
A:
I would say that it is in many ways similar to the system adopted in the UK.

 

Q: Would you agree that no one/single suits all and thus individual governments must devise their own specific strategies? Which factors define your country?

A: The Chinese decision to implement a total lock down on the nation thus preventing an uncontrolled spread of the Covid-19 virus fits well with the Lebanese culture.

Q: How are people reacting to your government’s choice?

A: People are reacting positively and believe that it was the best decision to quarantine the whole nation. However, currently a part of those that are on the breach of poverty are back on the streets rioting again.

 

Q: Are people following government instructions?

A: Almost all are abiding the government instructions.

 

Q: Please describe how the private sector is being affected by the present status.

A: The private sector is suffering considerably from the consequences of the current situation. A lot of work has almost come to a stop and only the minimum is being done. Movements are limited to the absolute minimum and many in the private sector have started adapting having employees work remotely from their homes. Another strategy is rotation where only one employee is allowed to work in their department at a time, due to this reduced work flow companies are laying employees off or are going bankrupt.

 

Q: Has the government enlisted the assistance of the private security sector?
A:
No, only government forces.

Q: What’s on your radar screen, do you have any particular fears or concerns?
A: 
The main concern is that a number of civilians are not acting as they should and that the riots taking place can lead to COVID-19 spreading across the country, a scenario that would be difficult to contain. We need to remain on high alert, manage the prices of commodity goods carefully, and make sure that civilians take the Covid-19 outbreak seriously.

 

DISCLAIMER

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the interviewee. They are published in good faith and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of PTG. 


An Evolving Crisis - Regional Updates. Country Status Report #5: Kenya

Over the coming weeks Pyramid Temi Group will be publishing a series of updates from our regional hubs. The objective of the updates is to deliver informed comment and insight from our experts as to how a series of countries are addressing the Covid-19 (Coronavirus) emergency.

If you would like the updates delivered directly to your email box please sign-up to service by clicking here

Please note that in addition to the Covid-19 updates, those who sign-up to the service will receive a complimentary copy of our updated country report.


 

As the Covid-19 pandemic continues to spread, we spoke with the Managing Director at Pyramid Temi Group’s local partner company in Kenya to understand more about the current situation and which issues will become the most critical over the coming months.


Q: How is the population reacting to the spread of the virus?

A: In general the majority of the population are abiding to all control measures. However, in the poorer and more overpopulated slums, they tend to try and fight the curfews in particular.

 

Q: Which system has been adopted by the provincial government?
A:
I would say that it is similar to the system adopted in the UK.

Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta

Q: Would you agree that no one/single suits all and thus individual governments must devise their own specific strategies? Which factors define your country?

A: The Government acted early from lessons learned in the USA and Europe. So the spread has been slow and managed well.

 

Q: How are people reacting to your government’s choice?

A: On the whole people are welcoming the actions that have been taken.

 

 

 

Q: Are people following government instructions?

A: On the whole yes they are.

 

Q: Please describe how the private sector is being affected by the present status.

A: The private sector is being affected by many people having to work from home. The country’s infrastructure is underdeveloped and so it presents a number of challenges. The level of economic decline, especially in Nairobi which is the commercial hub of Kenya, is worrying.

Q: Has the government enlisted the assistance of the private security sector?
A:
Not yet and it is not clear if this will change.

 

Q: What’s on your radar screen, do you have any particular fears or concerns?
A: 
The duration of the lockdown, the longer it is imposed the more the economy will be damaged. I’m also concerned about a potential breakdown in civil society in general, the poorest can not live hand to mouth and employees are struggling to keep business alive.

 

DISCLAIMER

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the interviewee. They are published in good faith and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of PTG. 


Adapting to Covid-19: Lessons Learned from Kidnapping

Mark Lowe

08/04/2020

When I first read this article I was struck by it’s timeliness and validity. I’ve asked the author’s permission to publish it on LinkedIn because I believe that it offers us all a series of valid and topical reflection points.

The author, Sue Williams QPM, needs little introduction but for those of us who don’t know Sue allow me to point out that after 27 years as a qualified Hostage Negotiator her extensive experience of kidnapping and hostage taking scenarios is extremely valuable.

When Sue left the Metropolitan Police she held the position of Head of the Hostage Crisis Negotiation Unit. Since leaving public duty, Sue has acted as a specialist consultant to families, companies and Non Governmental Organisations that have had to deal with kidnappings.

In addition to her charity and pro bono work, Sue is a Visiting Lecturer at Harvard Humanitarian Academy in Boston (USA) and an Associate Fellow of the Saïd Business School (University of Oxford).

Her LinkedIn profile can be accessed here: Sue Williams


Adapting to Covid-19: Lessons Learned from Kidnapping

All across the world, we are enduring extreme social distancing and isolation as our governments and health services fight COVID-19. I have been working for many years with people who have been kidnapped, people who have been held hostage, people who have had to learn to adapt to survive.

There are similarities with where we find ourselves today, vast numbers of us, forced to stay at home. So, what are the lessons to be learnt from ‘conduct after capture’ techniques and the parallels that could help us survive this ordeal?

If you are unlucky enough to be kidnapped and held hostage, you can expect to feel a combination of the following:

  • An almost paralysing fear of being harmed or death;
  • Continuing panic, loneliness and disbelief;
  • Depression occasioned by the knowledge that you have no control over this situation, and you do not know when it is going to end;
  • Internal stress created by the uncertainty of regular food and drink;
  • Desperate longing to be back with your family and friends; and
  • An obsessive reflection on the normal and routine aspects of your life, things you have so often taken for granted.

The extraordinary times of this virus do have some stark similarities to a hostage situation. In all probability you may be experiencing one or more of the above. Although our isolation is to a certain extent voluntary, and is happening for our own good and the good of our society, human beings are social creatures. Especially in times of crisis, so it is natural to crave for the company of our friends and family. That urge to be together makes us who we are.

So, let me stress that these are normal reactions to an abnormal temporary situation. Allow yourself to feel what you feel. You are not weak. You are you. Everyone experiences, if not all these things, then at least some of them. What you feel is an honest response to a difficult moment. Don’t beat yourself up. In this case your mission is to acknowledge where you are and then adapt and survive.

To give yourself the best chance of surviving, be kind to yourself. Each one of us responds differently. Your reaction will not be the same reaction as your partner’s, or your friend’s on WhatsApp, or a colleague on the phone. Be kind to them too, diffuse tension, don’t’ escalate it.

Recognize what you are feeling from the list above. This recognition will help you come to grips with what is, without doubt, difficult for everyone. Realize that you are experiencing a natural reaction to an unnatural situation.

The most important thing is to remember to be who you are. Never lose sight of this. Your normal life has routines, standards. Be that person.

Do not slip into a dishevelled, sloppy person who has used the situation to give up in some way, someone you don’t recognise. Plan a structure, a daily routine. This must include:

  • Personal hygiene – start each day in your normal way;
  • Appearance – look in the mirror and see who you usually see;
  • Keep mentally active – don't slump in front of daytime TV. Find a way to challenge yourself;
  • Stay up to date with medication;
  • Make sure you have adequate food and drink at usual meal-times – if you are on your own, really try to make a special effort with this;
  • Communicate with your friends and relatives. We are all so busy. Use this extra time to reach out to people with whom you may have lost touch;
  • Exercise, a lot can be achieved in an hour. Plan out a routine for yourself, or if you’re online, and most of us are, join a live stream class - something most hostages don’t have access to;
  • Maintain a sense of purpose and value. It’s hard for us to plan for the future, when we don’t know when things will get back to normal. But we do know they will, so this time may be useful to evaluate how you feel about what gives you purpose and value. Try and use those values to how you approach this difficult time; and
  • Knowledge is power, so keep well informed. Read outside your own comfort zone. Look at what is happening in other countries. Instead of waiting to have the news interpreted for you, compare and contrast stories from different news organisations yourself.

It is also important to plan for the long haul. If you think this will be over in two weeks and it drifts on for two months, or longer, this will add to your own psychological strain. So, lower your expectations to avoid disappointment. Expect months and you’ll be happy when it’s weeks.

Many former hostages I know adopted a combination of different coping mechanisms, some wrote plays, music, or played chess with discarded objects. People are amazing. They can achieve great things in very restricted and arduous circumstances.

So many people say, I never have the time to... Well now you do. Use that time to focus the mind and learn something different. Come out of this better and stronger. How could this apply to you? What could you do? Hold that thought. Write it down. Look at the words you’ve put on the paper. Look at them again tomorrow morning.

And one more thing, don’t forget, the longer your period in captivity, the more opportunities arise for a safe resolution and your return to freedom. Repeat that to yourself. The longer this goes on, the more likely it is that you will avoid the virus yourself and will survive.

Outside, other people are working hard to fix this, to help you, to help us all return to a normal life. Trust this because it is true. This time will pass. This is all temporary. You have not been forgotten.

Stay calm, stay safe. Adapt. Survive.

Sue Williams QPM

Associate Fellow

Saïd Business School

University of Oxford

 


Read the article on Linked In HERE


An Evolving Crisis - Regional Updates. Country Status Report #4: Bangladesh

Over the coming weeks Pyramid Temi Group will be publishing a series of updates from our regional hubs. The objective of the updates is to deliver informed comment and insight from our experts as to how a series of countries are addressing the Covid-19 (Coronavirus) emergency.

If you would like the updates delivered directly to your email box please sign-up to service by clicking here

Please note that in addition to the Covid-19 updates, those who sign-up to the service will receive a complimentary copy of our updated country report.


As the Covid-19 pandemic continues to spread, we spoke with the Managing Director at Pyramid Temi Group’s local partner company in Bangladesh to understand more about the current situation and which issues will become the most critical over the coming months.


Q: How is the population reacting to the spread of the virus?

A: The majority of the population are making efforts to keep the spread of the virus to a minimum. No one is complaining. I’d say that the great majority of people are just going along with what they are told to do.

Q: Which system has been adopted by the provincial government?
A:
It is probably closest to the Chinese strategy.

 

Q: Would you agree that no one/single suits all and thus individual governments must devise their own specific strategies? Which factors define your country?

A: The Chinese impose harsh fines for non compliance and have issued very clear instructions. Everyone understands the severity of the crisis and listens to the advice. Hong Kong got hit hard in 2003 with SARS so the people take Covid 19 extremely seriously. There are some lessons to be learned from China’s strategy that can be applied to all countries.

 

 

Q: How are people reacting to your government’s choice?

A: Heeding the advice and complying with the measures and instructions. 

 

Q: Are people following government instructions?

A: Yes, on the whole I would say that they are.

Q: Please describe how the private sector is being affected by the present status.

A: It is very hard to say. Everyone has been advised to reduce the number of employees in the office at any one time. There is very little international business being done.

 

Q: Has the government enlisted the assistance of the private security sector?
A:
Not yet.

 

Q: What’s on your radar screen, do you have any particular fears or concerns?
A: 
As a company we are focusing on a return to business as soon as the all clear is given. Many international clients have indicated their eagerness to get executive personnel back on the road. However, there are a number of companies that do not qualify for financial support from the government so anything longer than 4 to 6 months could have a crippling impact on a great number of companies.

 

DISCLAIMER

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the interviewee. They are published in good faith and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of PTG.